Discussion:
SKY News - Just What Has Come Into Law Today Regarding Internet Monitoring
(too old to reply)
a***@live.co.uk
2009-04-06 20:53:03 UTC
Permalink
Is it just the previous voluntary code or the full blown Internet
phone calls and every website you visit for the next ten years
logging, because I can’t imagine ISPs are anything like up to speed
for that.

If you’re behind a proxy (most of us are) then currently website
activity is only available under the voluntary code for four days.

Also, given that a large amount of web traffic is serviced by web page
copies in the proxy rather than the actual website how will that work
because in reality you haven’t actually visited the website at all, an
important distinction.

Also, how are ISPs expected to log VOIP telephone calls given the
numerous and often unpredictable technologies that are in use?

I mean doesn’t SKYPE use a file sharing approach for a start.

Has the full-blown ten-year law actually be turned into a technical
reality yet because I just can’t see it being do-able, let alone
affordable.

I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.

I won’t be criticising the NHS at all from now on, that probably comes
under religious hatred for Labour and we don't want to be going there
do we, they always save the worst for heretics.
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 21:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@live.co.uk
Is it just the previous voluntary code or the full blown Internet
phone calls and every website you visit for the next ten years
logging, because I can’t imagine ISPs are anything like up to speed
for that.
If you’re behind a proxy (most of us are) then currently website
activity is only available under the voluntary code for four days.
Also, given that a large amount of web traffic is serviced by web page
copies in the proxy rather than the actual website how will that work
because in reality you haven’t actually visited the website at all, an
important distinction.
Also, how are ISPs expected to log VOIP telephone calls given the
numerous and often unpredictable technologies that are in use?
I mean doesn’t SKYPE use a file sharing approach for a start.
Has the full-blown ten-year law actually be turned into a technical
reality yet because I just can’t see it being do-able, let alone
affordable.
I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.
I won’t be criticising the NHS at all from now on, that probably comes
under religious hatred for Labour and we don't want to be going there
do we, they always save the worst for heretics.
The Man does not have to do what he is pretending to do, he only needs
to catch a few, every-now-and-then (and he will), to make the point
and evolve the change.

WM
www.critest.com
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 21:10:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@live.co.uk
Is it just the previous voluntary code or the full blown Internet
phone calls and every website you visit for the next ten years
logging, because I can’t imagine ISPs are anything like up to speed
for that.
If you’re behind a proxy (most of us are) then currently website
activity is only available under the voluntary code for four days.
Also, given that a large amount of web traffic is serviced by web page
copies in the proxy rather than the actual website how will that work
because in reality you haven’t actually visited the website at all, an
important distinction.
Also, how are ISPs expected to log VOIP telephone calls given the
numerous and often unpredictable technologies that are in use?
I mean doesn’t SKYPE use a file sharing approach for a start.
Has the full-blown ten-year law actually be turned into a technical
reality yet because I just can’t see it being do-able, let alone
affordable.
I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.
I won’t be criticising the NHS at all from now on, that probably comes
under religious hatred for Labour and we don't want to be going there
do we, they always save the worst for heretics.
Here are the details ...

http://www.out-law.com/page-9929

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/communications/0,1000000085,39637592,00.htm

http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2239933/email-retention-law-comes-force

**
WM
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 21:24:04 UTC
Permalink
PART 3 INTERNET ACCESS, INTERNET E-MAIL OR INTERNET TELEPHONY

Data necessary to trace and identify the source of a communication

11.—(1) The user ID allocated.

(2) The user ID and telephone number allocated to the communication
entering the public telephone network.

(3) The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to whom
an Internet Protocol (IP) address, user ID or telephone number was
allocated at the time of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the destination of a communication

12.—(1) In the case of internet telephony, the user ID or telephone
number of the intended recipient of the call.

(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the name and
address of the subscriber or registered user and the user ID of the
intended recipient of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the date, time and duration of a
communication

13.—(1) In the case of internet access—

(a) The date and time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet
access service, based on a specified time zone,

(b) The IP address, whether dynamic or static, allocated by the
internet access service provider to the communication, and

(c) The user ID of the subscriber or registered user of the internet
access service.

(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the date and
time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet e-mail or internet
telephony service, based on a specified time zone.
Data necessary to identify the type of communication

14. In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the
internet service used.
Data necessary to identify users’ communication equipment (or what
purports to be their equipment)

15.—(1) In the case of dial-up access, the calling telephone number.

(2) In any other case, the digital subscriber line (DSL) or other end
point of the originator of the communication.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2009/draft/ukdsi_9780111473894_en_1

**
Don't know why it is still draft.

WM
Brave New Britain
2009-04-06 22:18:05 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 14:24:04 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
PART 3 INTERNET ACCESS, INTERNET E-MAIL OR INTERNET TELEPHONY
Data necessary to trace and identify the source of a communication
11.—(1) The user ID allocated.
(2) The user ID and telephone number allocated to the communication
entering the public telephone network.
(3) The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to whom
an Internet Protocol (IP) address, user ID or telephone number was
allocated at the time of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the destination of a communication
12.—(1) In the case of internet telephony, the user ID or telephone
number of the intended recipient of the call.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the name and
address of the subscriber or registered user and the user ID of the
intended recipient of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the date, time and duration of a
communication
13.—(1) In the case of internet access—
(a) The date and time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet
access service, based on a specified time zone,
(b) The IP address, whether dynamic or static, allocated by the
internet access service provider to the communication, and
(c) The user ID of the subscriber or registered user of the internet
access service.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the date and
time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet e-mail or internet
telephony service, based on a specified time zone.
Data necessary to identify the type of communication
14. In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the
internet service used.
Data necessary to identify users’ communication equipment (or what
purports to be their equipment)
15.—(1) In the case of dial-up access, the calling telephone number.
(2) In any other case, the digital subscriber line (DSL) or other end
point of the originator of the communication.
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2009/draft/ukdsi_9780111473894_en_1
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such as
http://www.freewire.net/
--
Brave New Britain
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 22:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 14:24:04 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
PART 3 INTERNET ACCESS, INTERNET E-MAIL OR INTERNET TELEPHONY
Data necessary to trace and identify the source of a communication
11.—(1) The user ID allocated.
(2) The user ID and telephone number allocated to the communication
entering the public telephone network.
(3) The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to whom
an Internet Protocol (IP) address, user ID or telephone number was
allocated at the time of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the destination of a communication
12.—(1) In the case of internet telephony, the user ID or telephone
number of the intended recipient of the call.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the name and
address of the subscriber or registered user and the user ID of the
intended recipient of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the date, time and duration of a
communication
13.—(1) In the case of internet access—
(a) The date and time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet
access service, based on a specified time zone,
(b) The IP address, whether dynamic or static, allocated by the
internet access service provider to the communication, and
(c) The user ID of the subscriber or registered user of the internet
access service.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the date and
time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet e-mail or internet
telephony service, based on a specified time zone.
Data necessary to identify the type of communication
14.  In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the
internet service used.
Data necessary to identify users’ communication equipment (or what
purports to be their equipment)
15.—(1) In the case of dial-up access, the calling telephone number.
(2) In any other case, the digital subscriber line (DSL) or other end
point of the originator of the communication.
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2009/draft/ukdsi_9780111473894_en_1
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
--
Brave New Britain
What happens if one does not fulfil the requirements of a law?

WM
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 22:31:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 14:24:04 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
PART 3 INTERNET ACCESS, INTERNET E-MAIL OR INTERNET TELEPHONY
Data necessary to trace and identify the source of a communication
11.—(1) The user ID allocated.
(2) The user ID and telephone number allocated to the communication
entering the public telephone network.
(3) The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to whom
an Internet Protocol (IP) address, user ID or telephone number was
allocated at the time of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the destination of a communication
12.—(1) In the case of internet telephony, the user ID or telephone
number of the intended recipient of the call.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the name and
address of the subscriber or registered user and the user ID of the
intended recipient of the communication.
Data necessary to identify the date, time and duration of a
communication
13.—(1) In the case of internet access—
(a) The date and time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet
access service, based on a specified time zone,
(b) The IP address, whether dynamic or static, allocated by the
internet access service provider to the communication, and
(c) The user ID of the subscriber or registered user of the internet
access service.
(2) In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the date and
time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet e-mail or internet
telephony service, based on a specified time zone.
Data necessary to identify the type of communication
14.  In the case of internet e-mail or internet telephony, the
internet service used.
Data necessary to identify users’ communication equipment (or what
purports to be their equipment)
15.—(1) In the case of dial-up access, the calling telephone number.
(2) In any other case, the digital subscriber line (DSL) or other end
point of the originator of the communication.
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2009/draft/ukdsi_9780111473894_en_1
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
--
Brave New Britain
"These calls will show up on your phone bill as a local 0845 call."

FAQ.

WM
Brave New Britain
2009-04-06 23:30:34 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:31:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
"These calls will show up on your phone bill as a local 0845 call."
But the ISP won't have your address, and so can't provide it to the
fuzz.
--
Brave New Britain
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-07 00:15:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:31:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
"These calls will show up on your phone bill as a local 0845 call."
But the ISP won't have your address, and so can't provide it to the
fuzz.
--
Brave New Britain
The ISP has date, time and duration.

The phone company has date, time and duration ... and full, personal
details.

WM
Brave New Britain
2009-04-07 08:20:55 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 17:15:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:31:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
"These calls will show up on your phone bill as a local 0845 call."
But the ISP won't have your address, and so can't provide it to the
fuzz.
--
Brave New Britain
The ISP has date, time and duration.
The phone company has date, time and duration ... and full, personal
details.
I know you can be tracked, but the ISP can't provide the information
they are supposed to, and there would have to be some collation of
data held by ISP and telecom. It would probably not work for dial-up
connections in the past, as I don't suppose the CLID would be retained
(even if not withheld).
--
Brave New Britain
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-07 09:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 17:15:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:31:13 -0700 (PDT), Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Brave New Britain
What if the ISP doesn't have the name and address of the user, such ashttp://www.freewire.net/
"These calls will show up on your phone bill as a local 0845 call."
But the ISP won't have your address, and so can't provide it to the
fuzz.
--
Brave New Britain
The ISP has date, time and duration.
The phone company has date, time and duration ... and full, personal
details.
I know you can be tracked, but the ISP can't provide the information
they are supposed to, and there would have to be some collation of
data held by ISP and telecom. It would probably not work for dial-up
connections in the past, as I don't suppose the CLID would be retained
(even if not withheld).
--
Brave New Britain
I cannot see your point, the police can get the information from
anyone they like. It is not about tracking, it as about
'sequestrating' the information from the companies/bodies.

Coupled with data mining.

You need to remember, that most ISPs etc have been doing what the law
now instructs them to do for some time.

WM
a***@live.co.uk
2009-04-07 19:28:11 UTC
Permalink
Nothing-new there then, that's just the existing voluntary code.

So, the idiots haven't thought it out then, have they, same as the
economy really, in fact, same as everything they touch.

Says it all really, that the woman we are rely on to apply all this
intelligence initiative and deviousness, in the name of catching
terrorists, isn’t even devious enough to stop us finding out about her
husbands porn habit.
Mike Hall
2009-04-06 22:32:58 UTC
Permalink
I'd like to know how they will monitor Skype calls. Unless Skype cooperate
then it is simply impossible for the ISP to know what is going on as Skype
use US military-level encription! If Skype was cooperating I would have
expected a terms and conditions change email to have arrived by now.

It's funny though. I was just reading how the Swedes decided simply to
ignore this EU directive.


Mike Hall
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-06 22:41:29 UTC
Permalink
I'd like to know how they will monitor Skype calls.  Unless Skype cooperate
then it is simply impossible for the ISP to know what is going on as Skype
use US military-level encription!  If Skype was cooperating I would have
expected a terms and conditions change email to have arrived by now.
It's funny though.  I was just reading how the Swedes decided simply to
ignore this EU directive.
Mike Hall
Skype Technologies S.A.
22/24 Boulevard Royal, 6e etage, L-2449 Luxembourg
Trade register number: R.C. Luxembourg B96.677
VAT number: LU 20180441

What did Luxembourg do?

WM
Ar
2009-04-08 18:27:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Hall
I'd like to know how they will monitor Skype calls. Unless Skype
cooperate then it is simply impossible for the ISP to know what is going
on as Skype use US military-level encription!
Skype has a back door for the security services.
Abo
2009-04-07 09:05:25 UTC
Permalink
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?

Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
Webmanager_CritEst
2009-04-07 09:52:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
It is not about monitoring email content or URLs (for now). It is
login/off times and dates/duration.

If any organisation has your details, the police can get it and, yes,
the relationship does work, internationally, with very few exceptions,
to 'prevent crime'.

WM
Abo
2009-04-07 10:50:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
It is not about monitoring email content or URLs (for now). It is
login/off times and dates/duration.
If any organisation has your details, the police can get it and, yes,
the relationship does work, internationally, with very few exceptions,
to 'prevent crime'.
Not that my email is of interest to anyone, it's mostly just spam anyway
lol. I don't know enough about networking but I'm guessing an ISP can
pick out the kind of traffic being sent/received? Otherwise it'd be easy
to make a constant traffic flow to camouflage other activity; just
download a Linux Live DVD iso distribution legally by bittorrent, limit
the upload and download bandwidth so it takes several hours to download
and leave it go. When it finishes, do it again.
Martin
2009-04-07 13:54:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
Post by Webmanager_CritEst
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
It is not about monitoring email content or URLs (for now). It is
login/off times and dates/duration.
If any organisation has your details, the police can get it and, yes,
the relationship does work, internationally, with very few exceptions,
to 'prevent crime'.
Not that my email is of interest to anyone, it's mostly just spam anyway
lol. I don't know enough about networking but I'm guessing an ISP can
pick out the kind of traffic being sent/received? Otherwise it'd be easy
to make a constant traffic flow to camouflage other activity; just
download a Linux Live DVD iso distribution legally by bittorrent, limit
the upload and download bandwidth so it takes several hours to download
and leave it go. When it finishes, do it again.
GCHQ got past having problems with that sort of thing around the end of WWII
--
Martin
Light of Aria
2009-04-07 14:23:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
It is not about monitoring email content or URLs (for now). It is
login/off times and dates/duration.

If any organisation has your details, the police can get it and, yes,
the relationship does work, internationally, with very few exceptions,
to 'prevent crime'.

WM



<<<


My router connected about 30 days ago and has not dropped it's connection.
It would not be all that meaningful.
a***@live.co.uk
2009-04-07 19:17:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
Most of us have additional web based email accounts so we can access
them from anywhere (although most ISPs also provide such a facility)
and so we can change ISP without changing email address.

Your ISP, even under the new rules, will only log your visit to the
email providers website, not any content, so it will depend upon where
your email provider is located as to what email information will be
logged and for how long.

No doubt our resident Taliban population sussed that out years ago.
Ar
2009-04-08 19:12:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
They can see who you're connected too, but a VPN should be encrypted, so
in theory can't see what you're doing.
Cynic
2009-04-09 11:41:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Abo
What happens around VPN connections? I'm working from home and connected
to the corporate network by VPN over my domestic broadband. Can the ISP
see my emails?
Not if the VPN link is encrypted (which will almost certainly be the
case).
Post by Abo
Or what about my email provider? They're based in the US and I use their
own pop3 and smtp servers, so I'm not using the ones provided by my own
ISP. Can my ISP still monitor my emails?
If sent unencrypted direct from your PC to/from the US server, then
yes, your ISP can monitor them.
--
Cynic
JR
2009-04-07 13:28:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@live.co.uk
I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.
So essentially you and your mates are going to carry on cross-posting
the same old shit but prefix it with Sky/BBC/ITN-News?
Martin
2009-04-07 14:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by JR
Post by a***@live.co.uk
I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.
So essentially you and your mates are going to carry on cross-posting
the same old shit but prefix it with Sky/BBC/ITN-News?
I was waiting for him to tell us the good news.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,617639,00.html#ref=nlint

"US President Barack Obama: "I take responsibility."

Berlusconi now spoke to him directly: "I would like to extend my congratulations
to Barack Obama," he said, adding that the economic crisis had begun in the US.
"Now he has to address it," he said and looked towards Obama. "We wish him all
the best for the citizens of the US and the entire world."

Then everyone turned to the American president. The 18 men and two women were
sitting in the drab ExCel Conference Centre, where red bouquets that resembled
flower boxes had been placed on the tables. The world's top politicians were
waiting for a closing statement.

"It is gratifying to see that good work has been done here," Obama began. "Ten,
20, 30 years ago, it was not a matter of course that countries which were
traditionally enemies solved problems together. After the Great Depression, a
similar group did not convene until 1944. Also in 1982, following the Mexico
Crisis, it took seven years before the problems were tackled together." Now he
spoke with urgency: "It is important that we do not sell short the results of
this summit. The press would like us to have conflicts. Instead we have attained
great achievements. And it is important that we exude confidence."

He then lowered his voice: "It is true, as my Italian friend has said, that the
crisis began in the US. I take responsibility, even if I wasn't even president
at the time." And he underscored how important it is for him "that we now
genuinely make progress. Thank you." Applause. ..."

Note: No mention of Brown. It was the USA who dunnit.

The only question is whether you can trust a German publication to tell the
truth <sarcasm alert>
--
Martin
a***@live.co.uk
2009-04-08 18:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
He then lowered his voice: "It is true, as my Italian friend has said, that the
crisis began in the US. I take responsibility, even if I wasn't even president
at the time." And he underscored how important it is for him "that we now
genuinely make progress. Thank you." Applause. ..."
Note: No mention of Brown. It was the USA who dunnit.
Note he said crisis began in the US and not crisis was caused by the
US.

Many things can bring down a house of cards but the reason it
collapses is because it's a house of cards.

Brown replicated the same economic conditions, that caused the US
crisis, here in the UK namely loose money, easy credit and an insane
housing market and my eight year old niece could have worked out that
was loony.

Then having put the banks to this monumental test we find he’d already
f**ked up the regulatory system that might have coped with it better.

Face it, your guy f**ked up, Labour f**ked up and, not for the first
time, we will find ourselves in the arms of the IMF yet again under a
Labour government.

From fourth richest economy in the World to basket case in twelve
short years, eighteen years in opposition last time how many for them
this time?

I will predict that we have now seen the last ever Labour government
and that ultimately will be Brown’s legacy.
lmnw43771
2009-04-07 22:58:48 UTC
Permalink
http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk:80/north-east-news/todays-evening-chronicle/2009/04/07/csa-orders-dad-to-cough-up-3p-or-face-the-bailiffs-72703-23329762/
<***@live.co.uk> wrote in message news:c3bdd562-8f53-414f-82c3-***@e5g2000vbe.googlegroups.com...
Is it just the previous voluntary code or the full blown Internet
phone calls and every website you visit for the next ten years
logging, because I can’t imagine ISPs are anything like up to speed
for that.

If you’re behind a proxy (most of us are) then currently website
activity is only available under the voluntary code for four days.

Also, given that a large amount of web traffic is serviced by web page
copies in the proxy rather than the actual website how will that work
because in reality you haven’t actually visited the website at all, an
important distinction.

Also, how are ISPs expected to log VOIP telephone calls given the
numerous and often unpredictable technologies that are in use?

I mean doesn’t SKYPE use a file sharing approach for a start.

Has the full-blown ten-year law actually be turned into a technical
reality yet because I just can’t see it being do-able, let alone
affordable.

I really do need to know if I should be downgrading my anti Brown New
Labour ramblings from c**ts to f**kwitts in future, just as a
precaution, and I might drop some of the sexist stuff as I value my
bollocks.

I won’t be criticising the NHS at all from now on, that probably comes
under religious hatred for Labour and we don't want to be going there
do we, they always save the worst for heretics.
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